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Level Up Your 3D Print Finishing Game with Hydro-dipping

Duncan Smith

Hydro dipping or water transfer printing is a remarkably simple process in concept and easy to do but technique appears to be the differentiator between great results and mediocre results but there is a limited obstacle to entry and learning to do it well could yield some really great results for finishing your 3D prints. I am going to do a quick introductory guide to finishing your parts using this technique.
 

What you will need:

A DIY Dip Kit is a good starting point as it includes almost everything you need to get started.
 

Getting your part ready to dip:

Remove any supports from your part and thoroughly sand to a smooth finish. (Sign up for my newsletter to get my free finishing guide). Once you have your part to the desired smoothness, clean your part with alcohol wipes or a lightly damp cloth. 
 

Sanded and spot putty applied to the remaining defects.

Sanded and spot putty applied to the remaining defects.

Primer and Base Coat:

Once your part has dried completely, spray the part lightly with primer to avoid uneven areas or pooling/dripping of the primer. You may need to do 2 coats to get good coverage (15-20 minutes between coats). Once the primer has had some time to dry, spray light and even coats of paint, again you may need 2 coats to get good even coverage (20-30 minutes between coats).

Primed and sanded.

Primed and sanded.

*Depending on your film, different colors of base coat may affect the final look of your part. Using a more transparent film will yield more dramatic effects. Experiment to find something you really like. When buying a dip kit, you can typically manually choose the base coat color or you can have the company provide a recommended color based on your film.
 

I used caramel and black to go under the wood and metal film respectively.

I used caramel and black to go under the wood and metal film respectively.

Cutting and Preparing Film:

Cut your film in a size that will be able to fit into your container as well as fully cover the surface area of your object. Review the instructions of the film to determine which side gets placed in the water. I like to use painters tape and tape around the border on the back side of the film as this helps it float and not allow water to run on top of the film. Having your film ready before getting the water to temperature will save you from having it cool down too quickly before dipping.

Preparing Dip Container for Dipping:

For the films, I have seen they are typically 20” wide so my recommendation is to get a container slightly wider than this and then as deep as you feel necessary based on the size of prints you make. 

Fill up your container with warm tap water and allow it to settle. You can optionally use a tank heater or something similar to heat your temperature up precisely however dipping has a range it works well with so it’s not critical. Fill with water almost all the way up. You will submerge your parts so don’t fill all the way – leave some room 2-3 inches from the top.
 

Placing Film:

Take your cut piece of film by the corners and very slowly lay your film in the container by starting by dropping the middle slightly into the container and then laying down the sides. Make sure you do this very slowly to avoid 1) creating any bubbles and 2) allowing the water to get on top of the film.

Film will expand slightly once in water.

Film will expand slightly once in water.

Once your film is set in the container, let it sit for about 1 minute. After this is complete spray the film entirely in slow, light, and even coats with the activator. Spray light horizontal strokes and then light vertical strokes. The activator only needs about 15 seconds to work so be ready to dip your part soon after this is complete.
 

Film should look like this after spraying activator

Film should look like this after spraying activator

Dipping:

Hold your object at about a 45-degree angle and dip slowly into the film. Maintain the angle while dipping or roll your object depending on what it is but rolling may cause some distortion in the image transfer. Once your object has been submerged completely, swirl it around under water. Remove from container.
 

Rinse:

You will need to remove any remaining residue from the activator by rinsing under warm tap/running water (low pressure).

Clear Coat:

Allow your part to fully dry. Once dry, apply light even coats of clear coat. You may want to apply 2-3 coats.

DSC_5375.JPG

DIY Wine Bottle Carousel Build

Duncan Smith

Introduction

This build is a complement to the Wine Glass Shelf build from earlier this year. This build is almost completely 3D printed with the exception of one hardware piece. With a simple finish and assembly you can enjoy a rotating wine bottle carousel.

What You Will Need

Materials:

Tools:

Any/all necessary protective equipment.

*Links provided are affiliate links if used to purchase something may provide Adylinn Studio a small commission.

3D Printed Parts

The print time for the carousel is quite extensive at its current design so I would not feel comfortable recommending 3D Hubs since the cost would likely be too high to justify. 

For those of you who do have a 3D printer, I recommend the following settings:

Carousel (decent surface quality to limit amount of sanding needed)

  • Filament choice not really important
  • 0.2mm layer height
  • 25-30% infill
  • Support
  • Raft recommended due to minimal surface contact
  • Brim optional

Base

  • Filament choice not really important
  • 0.2mm or higher layer height
  • 15-20% infill
  • No Support
  • Brim optional

Finishing 3D Prints

  1. Remove raft and support material.
  2. Sand carousel to the desired smoothness. Start with 220 or 320 grit and move up until you have a nice smooth part without visible print lines. 
  3. Wipe the sanded parts with a lightly damp cloth or paper towel.
  4. Apply even and light coat of primer.
  5. Allow enough time for primer to dry, then sand lightly.
  6. Wipe the sanded parts with a lightly damp cloth or paper towel.
  7. Once the parts are dry, evenly apply light coat(s) of bronze spray paint.
  8. Once the parts are dry, evenly apply light coat(s) of clear coat.

Assembly

  1. Glue the turntable bearing onto the carousel and base respectively. Alternatively, you can fasten the bearing with screws.
  2. Insert wine bottles and enjoy your Wine Bottle Carousel!

 

Thanks for taking the time to explore the project, I hope you try it and if you do I’d love to hear your feedback and see pictures of your build! Reach out on social media or leave a comment. If you have suggestions about future builds or improvements to the way the builds are presented please let me know.

     

    Smart Speaker/Lamp (DIY Google Home + Lamp

    Duncan Smith

    Introduction

    This build was intended to be a combination of a smart speaker (run by Google Assistant) and a smart lamp (Philips Hue light bulb) however, this was quite an ambitious build to complete in a month so the design work could use some refining and for that reason I have included the Fusion 360 design files in case you want to make modifications but please excuse the amateur design skills that will be clearly evident. This can be completed in a number of variations but I am going to document just my steps but feel free to improvise wherever you like. This is a combination of 3D printed parts (enclosure mostly) and an assembly of various components but I also opted to try my hand at Hydro-dipping the base for a cool finish - this is strictly optional and I will try to call it out in the materials list and instructions in case you want to skip this. No specialized tools are required and a 3D printer is not required - you can utilize a print service such as 3DHubs.com to obtain the 3D printed parts from a local printer.

    What You Will Need

    Materials:

    Recommendations

    I’d recommend taking some time to look at the project and see if you want to change anything ahead of time and plan around those changes. I specifically would look at some of the design issues with this particular build and suggest designing a new base with the speaker facing forward instead of downward.  Installing the software onto the Raspberry Pi is not advanced but it does require some level of technical expertise. I would suggest going with Amazon Alexa since that has been out for some time and most likely has the best beginner instructions available.

    Installing Smart Assistant

    If you intend to install Google Assistant - follow these instructions:

    https://developers.google.com/assistant/sdk/overview

    If you intend to install Amazon Alexa - follow these instructions:

    https://github.com/alexa/alexa-avs-sample-app/wiki/Raspberry-Pi

     

    3D Printed Parts

    If you are sourcing your 3D printed parts, I’d suggest a local printer on 3D Hubs so you can pick up your printed pieces without having to risk shipping. Be sure to communicate the below settings when placing your order:

    Base and Back (decent surface quality to limit amount of sanding needed)

    • Filament choice not really important
    • 0.2mm layer height
    • 15-20% infill
    • No Support
    • Brim optional

    Shade (decent surface quality to limit amount of sanding needed)

    • Translucent light filament (eSun Natural HIPS is a good choice)
    • 0.1 or 0.2mm layer height
    • 10% infill
    • No Support
    • Brim optional

    Light Fixture

    • Filament choice not really important
    • 0.2mm layer height or higher
    • 10% infill
    • No Support
    • Brim optional

    Order a 3D Print

    Finishing 3D Printed Shade

    1. Remove any brim if necessary.
    2. Sand shade to the desired smoothness. Start with 220 or 320 grit and move up until you have a nicely smooth part without visible print lines. 
    3. Wipe the sanded parts with a lightly damp cloth or paper towel.
    4. Once the parts are dry, evenly apply clear coat.

    Finish & Dip 3D Printed Base

    1. Remove any brim if necessary.
    2. Sand shade to the desired smoothness. Start with 120and move up to 320 grit and continue sanding until you have a nicely smooth part without visible print lines. 
    3. Use putty to fill any remaining defects.
    4. Sand down any spots where putty was applied until surface is smooth.
    5. Wipe the sanded parts with a lightly damp cloth or paper towel.
    6. Evenly apply primer to the parts.
    7. Once primer has dried, lightly sand primer and wipe down.
    8. At this point you can paint the parts and move to clear coating OR use base paint coat prior to hydro-dipping your part. 
    9. Follow hydro-dipping instructions to add a graphic to your pieces.
      1. This involves filling up a container of water between 80-85 degrees Fahrenheit.
      2. Cutting film to necessary dimensions and apply tape to the border.
      3. Placing film into water for 60 seconds while removing any bubbles or creases.
      4. Spray film lightly with activator.
      5. Dipping part at 30-45 degree angle to apply graphic (submerge completely)
      6. Rinsing under water for 3-5 minutes to remove residue/coating.
    10. Once the parts are dry, evenly apply clear coat.

    Assembly

    1. Remove any brim if necessary.
    2. Sand shade to the desired smoothness. Start with 220 or320 grit and move up until you have a nicely smooth part without visible print lines. 
    3. Wipe the sanded parts with a lightly damp cloth or paper towel.
    4. Once the parts are dry, evenly apply clear coat.

     

    Thanks for taking the time to explore the project, I hope you try it and if you do I’d love to hear your feedback and see pictures of your build! Reach out on social media or leave a comment. If you have suggestions about future builds or improvements to the way the builds are presented please let me know.

       

      LED Ring Lamp Build

      Duncan Smith

      DIY Build Using 3D Printed Parts

       

      Introduction

      This is an easy build that results in a cool little LED Ring Lamp. This light can be placed in various locations to add some color and style. No specialized tools are required and a 3D printer is not required - you can utilize a print service such as 3DHubs.com to obtain the 3D printed parts from a local printer.

      What You Will Need

      Materials:

      Tools:

      Any/all necessary protective equipment.
       

      3D Printed Parts

      If you are sourcing your 3D printed parts, I’d suggest a local printer on 3D Hubs so you can pick up your printed pieces without having to risk shipping. Be sure to communicate the below settings when placing your order:

      Ring and Base (decent surface quality to limit amount of sanding needed)

      • Filament choice not really important
      • 0.2mm layer height
      • 15-20% infill
      • Orientation - laying on side
      • Support needed, brim recommended

      Order a 3D Print

       

      Finishing Ring and Base

      1. Remove support material and brim
      2. Sand all the printed parts to the desired smoothness. Start with 120 grit and move up to 320 grit for a nicely smooth part without visible print lines. 
      3. Wipe the sanded parts with a lightly damp cloth or paper towel.
      4. Once the parts are dry, evenly apply primer.
      5. Once the primer has dried, sand lightly. Wipe the sanded parts with a lightly damp cloth or paper towel.
      6. Paint parts with desired color. For this build a matte white was used. Two coats is recommended.
      7. After the paint has had enough time to dry, apply clear coat. 

       

      Wood Veneer

      1. Wrap wood veneer around Ring to get an estimated length, then cut slightly longer than needed.
      2. Before using Clothes Iron remove any water and allow clothes iron to dry.
      3. Heat up a clothes iron on the cotton setting. (Warning - some residue from the process may get on heat plate, though this did not happen during my build)
      4. Wrap wood veneer around Ring and do not allow it to get loose as you move around the ring. 
      5. Use iron to melt adhesive, allowing it to stick to the 3D printed ring. The general speed to avoid scorching wood is 2 inches per second but it seems to be quite tolerant of the heat. Do this until all veneer is glued onto ring.
      6. Once at end, you can trim up the excess and finally adhere the last section of the veneer.
      7. Apply generous amount of linseed oil to veneer all the way around.
      8. Let oil sit and penetrate wood for roughly 10-15 minutes.
      9. Wipe any excess oil from veneer.

      Assembly

      1. Glue the 3D printed base to the Ring and make sure the holes line up. 
      2. Insert the LED strip into the ring to get a general estimate of the length needed. First, test the length and connect the connector to confirm before cutting.  Cut at the closest “cut point” on the strip (this is indicated on the strip itself). ***Be sure to cut slightly longer than the inner diameter as part of the strip will be inside the base.  
      3. Feed the LED strip into he base and connect to the power connecter.
      4. Remove backing of LED strip to expose the adhesive backing. Do this as you progress.
      5. Adhere LED strip to the inside of the Ring. 
      6. Route the wire out the back of the base.
      7. Connect the power connector to the wall and enjoy your new LED Ring Lamp!

       

      Thanks for taking the time to explore the project, I hope you try it and if you do I’d love to hear your feedback and see pictures of your build! Reach out on social media or leave a comment. If you have suggestions about future builds or improvements to the way the builds are presented please let me know.

       

       

      DIY Wine Glass Shelf

      Duncan Smith

       

      How to Build a DIY Shelf with Wine Glass Brackets

       

      Introduction

      This build gives you the option to easily upgrade an existing shelf in your home to add brackets to hang wine glasses OR a full DIY build including the shelf brackets and shelf. These instructions will be split into two so you can easily follow the desired option - the full DIY build will be posted here but the abbreviated instructions for upgrading an existing shelf are available to download below. No specialized tools are required and a 3D printer is not required - you can utilize a print service such as 3DHubs.com to obtain the 3D printed parts from a local printer. If you do not have a saw to cut the wood, you should be able to ask your hardware store to make the necessary cuts when purchasing the wood. 

       

      What You Will Need

      Materials:

      Tools:

      Any/all necessary protective equipment.

      3D Printed Parts

      If you are sourcing your 3D printed parts, I’d suggest a local printer on 3D Hubs so you can pick up your printed pieces without having to risk shipping. Be sure to communicate the below settings when placing your order:

      Shelf Brackets (decent surface quality to limit amount of sanding needed)

      • Strong filament like ABS is recommended.
      • 0.2mm layer height
      • 70-80% infill
      • No support
      • Brim optional

      Wine Glass Brackets (decent surface quality to limit amount of sanding needed)

      • Filament choice not really important
      • 0.2mm layer height
      • 20-30% infill
      • Orientation - thick/back end on build platform with brackets standing straight up.
      • No support
      • Brim optional

      Order a 3D Print

      Wine Glass Bracket Orientation.png

       

      Brackets

      1. Sand all the printed parts to the desired smoothness. Start with 120 grit and move up to 320 grit for a nicely smooth part without visible print lines. 
      2. Wipe the sanded parts with a lightly damp cloth or paper towel.
      3. Once the parts are dry, evenly apply primer.
      4. Once the primer has dried, sand lightly. Wipe the sanded parts with a lightly damp cloth or paper towel.
      5. Paint brackets with desired color. For this build a matte white was used for the glass brackets and then a metallic bronze paint was used for the shelf brackets. Two coats is recommended.
      6. After the paint has had enough time to dry, apply clear coat. 

       

      Shelf

      1. I recommend using a piece of MDF or plywood that is 3/4” thick, the depth should be 5 5/8” and it does not matter the length. I used 36” which allowed plenty of space for 6 wine glasses. 
      2. Plan in advance where you want your mounting shelf brackets to be as you will need to cut out small notches for the shelf to sit. 
      3. Sand the wood to desired smoothness. Use a damp cloth or paper towel to remove any dust.
      4. Prime the shelf on both sides - edges are do not need to be painted. 
      5. Lightly sand the shelf once the primer has dried.  Use a damp cloth or paper towel to remove any dust.
      6. Paint both sides with two coats. 
      7. Measure out and mark up where the brackets will be installed (both the shelf brackets and the wine glass brackets) and where the notches will be cut. For a 36” long shelf there was 30” between the 2 shelf brackets. If you desire to install the shelf brackets into a stud 30” may not work. 
      8. Pre-drill holes in the shelf for the wine glass brackets by using a wine glass bracket as a guide. 
      9. Cut out notches in the shelf (2 per side) for the shelf to sit on the brackets. I used a combination of a drill and a razor blade. This does not need to be very precise as it should be fully covered by the bracket. 
      10. Pre-cut the three strips of wood veneer for all sides of the shelf (do not need a strip for the back that will be against the wall).
      11. Before using Clothes Iron remove any water and allow clothes iron to dry.
      12. Heat up a clothes iron on the cotton setting. (Warning - some residue from the process may get on heat plate, though this did not happen during my build)
      13. Place the veneer strip on the side of the shelf.
      14. Use iron to melt adhesive, allowing it to stick to the shelf. The general speed to avoid scorching wood is 2 inches per second.
      15. Apply veneer to the other side and then finally finish with the front strip. Doing it in this order should avoid any visible seam from the front of the shelf. 
      16. Because the strips are thicker than the wood, use a box cutter/razer blade to remove any overhanging material. Use the shelf to keep the blade straight. 
      17. Apply a generous amount of linseed oil to veneer.
      18. Let oil sit and penetrate wood for roughly 10 minutes.
      19. Wipe any excess oil from veneer.
      20. Finally clear coat the entire shelf and the wood veneer. 

       

      Assembly and Mounting

      1. Glue is not necessary but you can optionally apply glue to each wine glass bracket before screwing them into the shelf. 
      2. Screw in all wine glass brackets using the pre-drilled holes to line up the brackets. 
      3. Measure and mark where the shelf brackets will be placed. Make sure the brackets when mounted on the wall will match up the notches you cut into the shelf in an earlier step. 
      4. Mounting the brackets into a stud is not necessary but recommended if anything heavy will be placed on shelf. I simply used drywall screws as the weight on top of the shelf would be very minimal. 
      5. Once the shelf brackets are installed you should be able to simply place the shelf on top of the brackets and the notches should allow the shelf to sit securely. 
      6. Hang your wine glasses and enjoy your DIY Wine Glass Shelf!

       

      Thanks for taking the time to explore the project, I hope you try it and if you do I’d love to hear your feedback and see pictures of your build! Reach out on social media or leave a comment. If you have suggestions about future builds or improvements to the way the builds are presented please let me know.

       

       

      ***Links provided are affiliate links if used to purchase something may provide Adylinn Studio a small commission to keep the site and projects running. This does not cost you anything.

       

      Concrete Clock Build

      Duncan Smith

      How to Build Your Very Own Clock with Concrete, Wood, and 3D Printed Parts

      Concrete clock hero.jpg

      Introduction

      The Concrete Clock was designed to utilize 3D printing to make a custom shape for the mold to shape the clock. The project includes a concrete clock made out of Shapecrete which was molded out of a 3D printed cavity, inside each hour indention I have inserted a wood insert which is a 3D printed shape with wood veneer adhered on top, and then finally I added a standard clock kit to finish off the clock. No specialized tools are required and a 3D printer is not required - you can utilize a print service such as 3DHubs.com to obtain the 3D printed parts from a local printer. 

       

      What You Will Need

      Materials:

      Tools:

      Any/all necessary protective equipment.

      3D Printed Parts

      If you are sourcing your 3D printed parts, I’d suggest a local printer on 3D Hubs so you can pick up your printed pieces without having to risk shipping. Be sure to communicate the below settings when placing your order:

      Mold Cavity (ideally this has decent surface quality to limit amount of sanding needed)

      • Any type of filament can be used – something cheap with good print quality. 
      • 0.2mm layer height
      • 10% infill
      • Support (all – not just off build platform)
      • Brim optional

      Inserts and Mount Piece (surface quality not important)

      • Any/cheap filament will do
      • 0.2mm layer height
      • 10-15% infill

      Support Block (surface quality not important)

      • Any/cheap filament will do
      • 0.2mm layer height
      • 15-20% infill

      Order a 3D Print

       

      Mold Cavity

      1.    Remove the support under the mounting hole for the clock. Be careful as this section is going to be a little fragile. 

      2.    Do some light sanding as needed but mostly optional unless there are obvious areas that could use some touch-up. The concrete can be sanded so this step isn’t absolutely crucial but it does help. 

      3.    Mix roughly 3 parts concrete mix to 1 part water (use the box instructions if using something different than Shapecrete). 

      4.    I tried a mold release solution of 1 part soap to 10 parts water but I am not sure it was very effective, try PAM or vegetable oil as a mold release agent but don’t use an excessive amount – just coat the inside cavity lightly. 

      5.    Place the support block under the shallow side of the cavity to be sure the top is flat for pouring the concrete in. 

      6.    Once it is well mixed and cake batter type consistency pour into mold. Be sure to get as much below and around the block for the clock kit. Try to fill close to the top edge but not all the way. You have roughly 30 minutes of working time so no need to rush this step. 

      Pour Concrete-1.jpg

      7.    Try to remove any air bubbles by slowly and gently shaking the mold.

      • Optionally you can use an orbital sander to apply vibrations to the outside of the mold.

      8.    Insert the mounting piece at the top of the clock (the deep side). This will create a hole for the clock to sit on top of a screw. 

      9.    Let the concrete mold sit for at least 48 hours. For now work on Wood Inserts.

      10.    Once concrete is hardened, remove from mold. You may need to break apart the mold to do this.

      11.    Sand outside of the concrete base to desired surface finish. You can use sandpaper manually or use an orbital sander. You can use as low as 80 grit initially and then move toward 320 grit or higher if desired. 

       

      Wood Inserts

      1.    Cut long enough strips of the wood veneer for the 12 inserts. 

      2.    Before using Clothes Iron remove any water and allow clothes iron to dry.

      3.    Heat up a clothes iron on the cotton setting. (Warning - some residue from the process may get on heat plate, though this did not happen during my build)

      4.    Place the veneer strips on the inserts

      5.    Use iron to melt adhesive, allowing it to stick to the 3D printed inserts. The general speed to avoid scorching wood is 2 inches per second but be cautious as to not melt or deform the plastic beneath. Do this until all veneer is glued onto all inserts.

      6.    Now trim up the excess around the inserts doing this upside down. Use a sharp razor blade box cutter to not tear the wood. 

      7.    Use sanding paper or a Dremel sanding tool to round the corners.

      8.    Apply a generous amount of linseed oil to veneer 

      9.    Let oil sit and penetrate wood for roughly 10 minutes.

      10.    Wipe any excess oil from veneer.

      11.    Optionally add clear coat to the inserts.

       

      Finishing

      1.    Depending on the type of finish you prefer you can either leave the bare concrete clock as-is as well as keep the clock hands white or do some variation of the below steps. The steps below will outline the steps I used for the exact finish I went with. 

      2.    Tape around the ring of the clock face.

      3.    Use white spray paint to coat the face.

      4.    Spray paint the clock hands with gold metallic spray paint.  

      5.    Once white paint is dry, remove painters tape from around face.

       

      Assembly

      1.    Apply hot glue to the back of each Wood Insert and push into each hour inset to glue into place. Other types of glue are most likely acceptable.

      2.    Install the clock kit per the kit instructions. 

      3.    Once installed you will need to cut (roughly ½”) off the minute and second hands as it will overhand the clock face. 

       

      Mounting

      Since the clock will be quite heavy, I recommend using a screw into a stud to hang the clock. 

       

       


      Thanks for taking the time to explore the project, I hope you try it and if you do I’d love to hear your feedback and see pictures of your build! Reach out on social media or leave a comment. If you have suggestions about future builds or improvements to the way the builds are presented please let me know.

       

       

      ***Links provided are affiliate links if used to purchase something may provide Adylinn Studio a small commission to keep the site and projects running. This does not cost you anything.

       

      Teardrop Lamp Build

      Duncan Smith

      How to Build Your Very Own Teardrop Lamp with Concrete, Wood, and 3D Printed Parts

      teardroplamp.png

      Introduction

      The Teardrop Lamp was designed to utilize 3D printing for a mixed media project. The project includes a concrete base made out of Shapecrete which was molded out of a 3D printed mold, on top of the concrete base sits a wood ring which is a 3D printed ring with wood veneer adhered around the face, then at the top sits the 3D printed shade printed in natural color HIPS which gives a nice white translucent look which works well with white and color lights. No specialized tools are required and a 3D printer is not required - you can utilize a print service such as 3DHubs.com to obtain the 3D printed parts from a local printer.

      What You Will Need

      Materials:

      Tools:

      Any and all protective equipment.

      Concrete Base

      1. Ensure that the inside of the mold is smooth, if not, sand as best as you can. The concrete can be sanded so this step isn’t absolutely crucial but it does help.
      2. Mix roughly 3 parts concrete mix to 1 part water (use the box instructions if using something different than Shapecrete). 
      3. Optional (may help remove concrete from the mold): mix 10 parts water and 1 part dishwashing soap and lightly coat to inside of the mold. Pour concrete immediately after.
      4. Once it is well mixed and cake batter type consistency, pour into mold. Try to fill close to the top edge but not all the way. You have roughly 30 minutes of working time so no need to rush this step. 
      5. Try to remove any air bubbles by slowly shaking the mold. Optionally you can use an orbital sander to apply vibrations to the outside of the mold while spinning it around.
      6. Let the concrete mold sit for at least 48 hours. For now, work on Wood Ring and Shade steps. 
      7. Once the concrete is hardened, remove from mold. You may need to break apart the mold to do this.
      8. Sand outside of the concrete base to desired surface finish. You can use sandpaper manually or use an orbital sander. You can use as low as 80 grit initially and then move toward 320 grit or higher if desired. 
      Starting with a 3D mold for the concrete to settle.

      Wood Ring

      1. Lightly sand the outside of the 3D printed ring so the surface is smooth enough for the veneer to adhere to it. You can use 120 or 220 grit sandpaper for this. 
      2. Wipe down sanded ring with a very lightly damp paper towel and remove all dust.
      3. Wrap the veneer around the ring to measure how much is needed, cut roughly 1 inch longer than needed.
      4. Before using Clothes Iron remove any water and allow clothes iron to dry.
      5. Heat up a clothes iron on the cotton setting. (Warning - some residue from the process may get on heat plate, though this did not happen during my build)
      6. Wrap wood veneer around wood ring and use a binder clip to assist keeping veneer in place during the process.
      7. Use iron to melt adhesive, allowing it to stick to the 3D printed ring. The general speed to avoid scorching the wood is 2 inches per second but it seems to be quite tolerant of the heat. Do this until all veneer is glued onto the ring.
      8. Once at the end you can trim up the excess and finally adhere the last section of the veneer.
      9. Apply linseed oil to veneer by applying a generous amount all the way around.
      10. Let the oil sit and penetrate wood for roughly 10 minutes.
      11. Wipe any excess oil from veneer.

      Shade

      1. Lightly sand the outside of the 3D printed shade so the surface is smooth. 
      2. Wipe down sanded shade with very lightly damp paper towel and remove all dust.
      3. Optionally apply clear coat to sanded shade and let dry.

      Assembly

      1. Insert light fixture into the concrete base and glue the fixture to the base.
      2. Glue wood ring to concrete base.
      3. Insert Light Bulb into fixture
      4. Lightly hot glue Shade to wood ring (I would suggest using a drop of hot glue to 2-4 points around the ring in the event you want/need to change the bulb. You will be able to use a knife to remove shade from the ring. The diameter of the shade at the top is very narrow and does not allow for easy exchanging of bulbs.
      5. Plug in and enjoy.
      Lamp-1.jpg

      Recommendations

      1. I would suggest color changing LED bulbs for lights since it will give you long lasting bulbs and the flexibility to change the color of the lights at any time.
      2. Phillips Hue bulbs though expensive can give you “smart” features for your lamps as well.
      3. Here are some different options for light bulbs I recommend (in order of price):

        Standard E26 light bulb ~$6

        RGB LED Light bulb ~$16

        Phillips Hue Smart Light Bulbs Starter Pack (WHITE ONLY) ~$60

        Phillips Hue Smart Light Bulbs Pack (FULL COLOR) ~$200

        The light kits I chose were on sale but still expensive. Here is an alternative option that is much cheaper:

        Light Kit ~$20

         

      3D Printed Parts

      If you are sourcing your 3D printed parts, I’d suggest a local printer on 3D Hubs so you can pick up your printed pieces without having to risk shipping. Be sure to communicate the below settings when placing your order:

      Shade (this needs to have high surface quality)

      • Filament recommendation - e-Sun HIPS in Natural Color
      • 0.1mm layer height
      • 25% infill
      • Slow printing speed
      • No support
      • Brim optional

      Ring and Mold for Concrete Base (surface quality not important)

      • Filament recommendation - white PLA (any/cheap)
      • 0.2mm layer height
      • 15% infill
      • Support optional (might be needed for concrete base mold)

      Visit 3D Hubs to order a 3D print.


      Thanks for taking the time to explore the project, I hope you try it and if you do I’d love to hear your feedback and see pictures of your build! Reach out on social media or leave a comment. If you have suggestions about future builds or improvements to the way the builds are presented please let me know.

       

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